John Winston Clark
Stability With Knowledge

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The JWC Blog page is built to keep the conversations going. If you have a post you'd like to share with us, if you wish to share your PD story, trials, and tribulations please let us know! We are here to keep an active dialog with our visitors.

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April is Parkinson's Awareness Month

 

April 10th, 2018

Good morning friends, 

As some of you already know this month is April and is Parkinson’s Awareness month. We are in search for the cure and also very proactive with the importance of education on the disease. Be sure to donate today as well as take the time to #StartAConversation#JohnWClarkparkinsonsfoundation

The more we communicate and share our stories the less in the dark we are. 

Here are the five most common stages:

Stage One

During this initial stage, the person has mild symptoms that generally do not interfere with daily activities. Tremor and other movement symptoms occur on one side of the body only. Changes in posture, walking and facial expressions occur.

Stage Two

Symptoms start getting worse. Tremor, rigidity and other movement symptoms affect both sides of the body. Walking problems and poor posture may be apparent. The person is still able to live alone, but daily tasks are more difficult and lengthy.

Stage Three

Considered mid-stage, loss of balance and slowness of movements are hallmarks. Falls are more common. The person is still fully independent, but symptoms significantly impair activities such as dressing and eating.

Stage Four

At this point, symptoms are severe and limiting. It’s possible to stand without assistance, but movement may require a walker. The person needs help with activities of daily living and is unable to live alone.

Stage Five

This is the most advanced and debilitating stage. Stiffness in the legs may make it impossible to stand or walk. The person requires a wheelchair or is bedridden. Around-the-clock nursing care is required for all activities. The person may experience hallucinations and delusions. The Parkinson’s community acknowledges that there are many important non-motor symptoms as well as motor symptoms.

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Thank you and God Bless!